“Who’s on your team?” More than you thought.

Who’s on your team? The question springs from a generality, an easily understood concept that in corporations, as in any organization made up of leaders and followers, the combined strength of the team in its members and its output is fundamental to the success of the project. But in the specifics, we must all ask … More “Who’s on your team?” More than you thought.

“Spectacular achievements come from unspectacular preparation.”

“Spectacular achievements come from unspectacular preparation.”* The leaders of the most successful Antarctic expeditions knew this well. So do the most successful of entrepreneurs in any field. The most compelling parts of any expedition story always seem to begin when the unpredictable forces of nature seem ready to overwhelm, or when the glimmering hope of … More “Spectacular achievements come from unspectacular preparation.”

On the Value of Informal Antarctic Conferences

The two conferences previously mentioned (the SouthPole-sium v3 and the meeting of the Shackleton Appreciation Society) with their hopefully biennial convocations each have a social and educational value far in excess of their modest cost. Although neither—relatively informal as they are—will add much luster to your academic portfolio, you may well learn as much from … More On the Value of Informal Antarctic Conferences

Now in Print: “When Your Life Depends on It” co-authored by David Hirzel and Brad Borkan

Terra Nova Press is pleased to announce the publication of our latest book When Your Life Depends on It: Extreme Decision-Making Lessons from the Antarctic. Co-written by Brad Borkan (London), this book uses epic true stories from the “heroic age” of Antarctic exploration to place the reader in those life and death situations and asks … More Now in Print: “When Your Life Depends on It” co-authored by David Hirzel and Brad Borkan

Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 23, 1916: ““I thank God that we have been spared through this fearful nightmare.”

–from the log kept by Captain Stenhouse— “July 23.—“Caught glimpse of Coulman Island through haze. . . . eighty miles off Coulman Island. Pressure continued intermittently throughout the day and night, with occasional very heavy squeezes to the ship which made timbers crack and groan. The ship’s stern is now in a more or less … More Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 23, 1916: ““I thank God that we have been spared through this fearful nightmare.”