Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, August 15, 1916: ” A week to-day the sun returns.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— “A week to-day the sun returns. I am training the puppies, but have made a mistake; that is, I should have tied them up before putting them into harness; they were frolicksome. In a week they travelled in harmony with Oscar, Gunner, and … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, August 15, 1916: ” A week to-day the sun returns.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July, 1916: “The sun effects amongst the opalescent clouds. . . .”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— “Another accident. While ski-ing down a slope [Ernest] Wild came to grief; it means a fortnight in his bunk. Weather greatly improved. The sun effects amongst the opalescent clouds are wonderful to behold, no artist could portray them.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July, 1916: “. . . . a better pal amidst toil and trouble never existed.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— “All was going well until one day Richy [R. W. Richards] collapsed. He threw up his arms, gave a cry, and fell down in a faint. Cope was soon to his aid; the long journey had strained his heart. No words could express … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July, 1916: “. . . . a better pal amidst toil and trouble never existed.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “The hut on our first entering, although black and grimy, was like a palace to us.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— “Our first thoughts after the sad news were for the dogs; if they were not secured there would be some severe fighting. After which, we entered the Hut. It is 289 days since we left, and much snow has fallen on the Antarctic … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “The hut on our first entering, although black and grimy, was like a palace to us.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “Once more the Great White South has taken its toll.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— [The men marooned at the Discovery Hut since their return from the Barrier have determined to make their way over the sea ice to return to the hut at Cape Evans] “July 15th. This turned out a beautiful calm day with full moon, … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “Once more the Great White South has taken its toll.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 21st, 1916: “We have made up our minds to store large quantities of blubber in case the relief ship does not put in an appearance.”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail” “All was going well until one day Richy collapsed. He threw up his arms, gave a cry, and fell down in a faint. Cope was soon to his aid: the long journey had strained his heart. No words could express my sorrow when I heard the news. … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 21st, 1916: “We have made up our minds to store large quantities of blubber in case the relief ship does not put in an appearance.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15th, 1916: ‘It is 289 days since we left, and much snow has fallen on the Antarctic since. . . .”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail” “Our first thoughts after the sad news were for the dogs; if they were not secured there would be some severe fighting. After which, we entered the [Cape Evans] Hut. It is 289 days since we left, and much snow has fallen on the Antarctic since, but … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15th, 1916: ‘It is 289 days since we left, and much snow has fallen on the Antarctic since. . . .”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15th, 1916: ‘Once more the Great White South has taken its toll.’

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail” “July 15. This turned out a beautiful calm day, temp. down to -40. Packed sledge; under way 10 o’clock. When we were opposite Inaccessible Island, it came over very dark, and on looking up to the moon found it was in eclipse. It is strange that an … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15th, 1916: ‘Once more the Great White South has taken its toll.’

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, May 8, 1916: “. . .the Antarctic Region is a harsh mistress.“

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail”— During breakfast on the 8th, the Skipper [Mackintosh] asked me what I thought about him going to Cape Evans, with Hayward, who volunteered to accompany him. . . . I told him we would have a blizzard within two hours and advised him not to attempt it. … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, May 8, 1916: “. . .the Antarctic Region is a harsh mistress.“

Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift, October 7, 1915: “. . . still, it can be done. . . “

–from the log of J. R. Stenhouse, quoted by Shackleton in “South”— “October 7.—As time wears on the possibility of getting back to the Barrier deserves consideration; if we do not get clear until late in the season we will have to turn south first, although we have no anchors and little moorings, no rudder … More Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift, October 7, 1915: “. . . still, it can be done. . . “