February 11, 1913: “But my husband is a good sport . . . (Kathleen Scott)

–from a news article in the San Francisco Chronicle February 11, 1913– “Mrs. Robert F. Scott left San Francisco last Wednesday on the Australian line steamer Anorangi, sanguine in the hope that she would greet her husband within two months at some New Zealand port. When seen here Mrs. Scott said she was sorry for … More February 11, 1913: “But my husband is a good sport . . . (Kathleen Scott)

January 29, 1913: Mawson’s good luck and near miss

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “. . . . there now remained only about twenty small chips of cooked dog meat and a few ounces of chocolate which I had kept carefully guarded for emergencies.  However, the wind and drift got up in the night and the start next morning was … More January 29, 1913: Mawson’s good luck and near miss

November 17, 1912: Some notes from the doomed polar party

–from Tryggve Gran’s account The Norwegian with Scott— “17 November.  Back to ‘One Ton Camp’.  The bad weather disappeared yesterday and we had a pleasant march.  The going was soft and we used our skis, which went well–just like home for once.  I am using Scott’s skis; they at any rate will complete the 3,000-km … More November 17, 1912: Some notes from the doomed polar party

November 12, 1912: A burial on the Barrier

–from Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s account The Worst Journey in the World— “Nearly midday.  11-12 miles south of One Ton.  . . .Then Atkinson read the lesson from the Burial Service from Corinthians.  Perhaps it has never been read in a more magnificent cathedral and under more impressive circumstances–for it is a grave which kings must envy.  … More November 12, 1912: A burial on the Barrier

November 12, 1912: “We have found them. . . .it is too bad for words.”

–from Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s account The Worst Journey in the World — “November 12.  Near midday.  11-12 miles south of One Ton.  We have found them–to say it has been a ghastly day cannot express it–it is too bad for words.  The tent was there, about half-a-mile to the west of our course, and close to … More November 12, 1912: “We have found them. . . .it is too bad for words.”

November 4, 1912: The Northern Party makes Hut Point: Home at last!

–from Raymond Priestley’s account Antarctic Adventure— “After a short sleep we now set out on our way acroos the seven miles of sea ice intervening between us and Hut Point.   We were within a mile of our destination when one of the big sastrugi over which we were marching capsized the sledge. . . . … More November 4, 1912: The Northern Party makes Hut Point: Home at last!