Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, Elephant Island, July, 1916: “July was a particularly obnoxious month.”

–from Frank Hurley’s account “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “July was a particularly obnoxious month. The variable temperatures of early spring frayed our tempers and added to our discomforts. Warmer days were marked by increased humidity, in which we felt the cold more than the actual winter. We now experienced occasional rain, and the stronger rays of the … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, Elephant Island, July, 1916: “July was a particularly obnoxious month.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, June 23, 1916: The day after Midwinter’s Day at Cape Wild, Elephant Island

—from the diary of Thomas Orde Lees— “23 June. Midwinter’s Day is a thing of the past and once more we have been hungry again. What then do we have to look forward to now? Our rescue, whenever that may be; but almost as cheering, the certainty of the sun’s return, and therefore increasingly lengthening … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, June 23, 1916: The day after Midwinter’s Day at Cape Wild, Elephant Island

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 13, 1916: It seemed as if evil forces were arrayed to torment us.”

–from Frank Hurley’s account published as “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “It seemed as if evil forces were arrayed to torment us. No sooner was one peril overcome than another rose in its place. Streams of ice fragments, borne along by surface currents or drive by the winds, were driven to the lee side of our floe. For … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 13, 1916: It seemed as if evil forces were arrayed to torment us.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 11, 1916: “. . . we gazed spellbound on a terrifying spectacle.. . . .”

–from Frank Hurley’s account published as “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “The dawn broke, foggy, cheerless, and sinister. A piercing wind was blowing from the north-west, bringing sleet which froze in a glassy veneer. While we were making ready to get under way, fields of pack came rapidly driving down from the north. There was no choice. Our … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 11, 1916: “. . . we gazed spellbound on a terrifying spectacle.. . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, February 2, 1916: “The venture was entirely successful”

–from Frank Hurley’s account “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “Observations showed that the distance between our old Ocean Camp and our new Patience Camp had decreased from ten miles to six, owing to the shuffling of the ice floes. Since it was still light all night, Crean and I with the dogs left camp at one a.m. to … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, February 2, 1916: “The venture was entirely successful”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 29, 1916: “I decided to send Macklin and Hurley back with their dogs.”

–from Shackleton’s account “South”— “The ice between us and Ocean Camp, now only about five miles away and actually to the south-west of us, was very broken, but I decided to send Macklin and Hurley back with their dogs [the two teams yet remaining] to see if there were any more food that could be … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 29, 1916: “I decided to send Macklin and Hurley back with their dogs.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 1916: “….a doubtful mixture not unlike haggis.. . .”

–from Frank Hurley’s account “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “Occasionally meals were modified with a ration of dog pemmican. This was canned by the makers in one-pound tins, and the ‘Peggy’ for the next day took the tin into his sleeping bag overnight to thaw it out. For breakfast the square of pemmican was cut into four equal … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 1916: “….a doubtful mixture not unlike haggis.. . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 14, 1916: “The decision was made this morning to shoot most of the dogs. . . .”

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie– “14 January. Position 66º 57’ S., 52º 41’ W. Some important developments took place today; the Boss suddenly got anxious over the absence of seals which has held for some days, i.e. a possible shortage of dog food. “Now there seems to be only two alternatives as regards … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 14, 1916: “The decision was made this morning to shoot most of the dogs. . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 1916: “To lose a spoon or a knife was a calamity.”

–from Frank Hurley’s account “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “Table furniture was of the simplest. Our tent [Hurley shared a tent with Shackleton, Hudson, and James] possessed a sheath-knife which was common property. Each man had, in addition to a tin lid which served as a plate, a spoon, either a souvenir from the ‘Endurance’ or one carved … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, January 1916: “To lose a spoon or a knife was a calamity.”