As Good as Your Word: Promises made to be kept

Promises and commitments are the outward signs of mutual trust between parties, a shared understanding, and a bargain to be upheld at each end. A contract, if you will, whether written and signed, or verbal and committed over a handshake, to terms large and detailed involving the exchange of vast sums of money, or as … More As Good as Your Word: Promises made to be kept

Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 22, 1916: “. . . . made final preparations for abandoning ship.”

–from the log kept by Captain Stenhouse— “July 22.—Ship in bad position in newly frozen lane, with bow and stern jammed against heavy floes; heavy strain with much creaking and groaning. 8 a.m.—Called all hands to stations for sledges, and made final preparations for abandoning ship. Allotted special duties to several hands to facilitate quickness … More Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 22, 1916: “. . . . made final preparations for abandoning ship.”

April 3, 1916: Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ lands in New Zealand, 312 days after being carried away from Cape Evans

–from Shackleton’s account “South”— “Stenhouse displayed throughout fine seamanship and dogged perseverance. He accomplished successfully one of the most difficult voyages on record, in an ocean area notoriously stormy and treacherous. On March 23 he established wireless communication with Bluff Station, New Zealand, and o the next day was in touch with Wellington and Hobart. … More April 3, 1916: Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ lands in New Zealand, 312 days after being carried away from Cape Evans

March 13-14, 1916: The of the end of the drift of the ‘Aurora’ “We ‘spliced the main brace’”

–from Shackleton’s account “South” quoting from Captain J. R. Stenhouse— “Early in the afternoon [of March 13] a little progress was made, with all hands standing by to fend off high ice, and at 4.50 p.m. the ‘Aurora’ cleared the main pack. An hour was spent shipping the jury rudder under the counter, and the … More March 13-14, 1916: The of the end of the drift of the ‘Aurora’ “We ‘spliced the main brace’”

The Drift of Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’, February 12-14, 1916: “The ship was floating now amid fragments of floe, and bumping considerably in the swell. . . .”

–from Shackleton’s account ‘South’— “The break-up of the floe came on February 12. Strong northeast to southeast winds put the ice in motion and brought a perceptible swell. The ship was making some water, a foretaste of trouble to come, and all hands spent the day at the pumps, reducing the water from three feet … More The Drift of Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’, February 12-14, 1916: “The ship was floating now amid fragments of floe, and bumping considerably in the swell. . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ Adrift, mid-January 1916: “. . . the ‘Aurora’ still lay in the ice. . . .”

–adapted by Shackleton from the log of Captain J. R. Stenhouse of the ‘Aurora’— “The middle of January was passed and the ‘Aurora’ still lay in the ice. The period of continuous day was drawing towards its close, and there was appreciable twilight at midnight. A dark water-sky could be seen on the northern horizon. … More Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ Adrift, mid-January 1916: “. . . the ‘Aurora’ still lay in the ice. . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ adrift, January 7, 1915: “Stenhouse was economizing in food.”

–from Shackleton’s account “South”— “At the end of the first week in January the ship was in lat. 65º 45’ S. The pack was well broken a mile from the ship, and the ice was rolling fast. Under the bows and stern the pools were growing and stretching away in long lanes to the west. … More Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ adrift, January 7, 1915: “Stenhouse was economizing in food.”