Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 22, 1916: “. . . . made final preparations for abandoning ship.”

–from the log kept by Captain Stenhouse— “July 22.—Ship in bad position in newly frozen lane, with bow and stern jammed against heavy floes; heavy strain with much creaking and groaning. 8 a.m.—Called all hands to stations for sledges, and made final preparations for abandoning ship. Allotted special duties to several hands to facilitate quickness … More Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 22, 1916: “. . . . made final preparations for abandoning ship.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, June 23, 1916: The day after Midwinter’s Day at Cape Wild, Elephant Island

—from the diary of Thomas Orde Lees— “23 June. Midwinter’s Day is a thing of the past and once more we have been hungry again. What then do we have to look forward to now? Our rescue, whenever that may be; but almost as cheering, the certainty of the sun’s return, and therefore increasingly lengthening … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, June 23, 1916: The day after Midwinter’s Day at Cape Wild, Elephant Island

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 13, 1916: It seemed as if evil forces were arrayed to torment us.”

–from Frank Hurley’s account published as “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “It seemed as if evil forces were arrayed to torment us. No sooner was one peril overcome than another rose in its place. Streams of ice fragments, borne along by surface currents or drive by the winds, were driven to the lee side of our floe. For … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 13, 1916: It seemed as if evil forces were arrayed to torment us.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 11, 1916: “. . . we gazed spellbound on a terrifying spectacle.. . . .”

–from Frank Hurley’s account published as “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “The dawn broke, foggy, cheerless, and sinister. A piercing wind was blowing from the north-west, bringing sleet which froze in a glassy veneer. While we were making ready to get under way, fields of pack came rapidly driving down from the north. There was no choice. Our … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 11, 1916: “. . . we gazed spellbound on a terrifying spectacle.. . . .”

April 3, 1916: Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ lands in New Zealand, 312 days after being carried away from Cape Evans

–from Shackleton’s account “South”— “Stenhouse displayed throughout fine seamanship and dogged perseverance. He accomplished successfully one of the most difficult voyages on record, in an ocean area notoriously stormy and treacherous. On March 23 he established wireless communication with Bluff Station, New Zealand, and o the next day was in touch with Wellington and Hobart. … More April 3, 1916: Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’ lands in New Zealand, 312 days after being carried away from Cape Evans

March 13-14, 1916: The of the end of the drift of the ‘Aurora’ “We ‘spliced the main brace’”

–from Shackleton’s account “South” quoting from Captain J. R. Stenhouse— “Early in the afternoon [of March 13] a little progress was made, with all hands standing by to fend off high ice, and at 4.50 p.m. the ‘Aurora’ cleared the main pack. An hour was spent shipping the jury rudder under the counter, and the … More March 13-14, 1916: The of the end of the drift of the ‘Aurora’ “We ‘spliced the main brace’”

The Drift of Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’, February 12-14, 1916: “The ship was floating now amid fragments of floe, and bumping considerably in the swell. . . .”

–from Shackleton’s account ‘South’— “The break-up of the floe came on February 12. Strong northeast to southeast winds put the ice in motion and brought a perceptible swell. The ship was making some water, a foretaste of trouble to come, and all hands spent the day at the pumps, reducing the water from three feet … More The Drift of Shackleton’s ‘Aurora’, February 12-14, 1916: “The ship was floating now amid fragments of floe, and bumping considerably in the swell. . . .”