Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 8, 1916: “The job was nearly done.”

–from Shackleton’s account “South”— “The morning of May 8 broke thick and stormy, with squalls from the north-west. We searched the waters ahead for a sign of land, and though we could see nothing more than had met our eyes for many days, we were cheered by a sense that the goal was near at … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 8, 1916: “The job was nearly done.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 6. 1916: “. . . . it was the best that I could do.”

[aboard the ‘James Caird’ along on the way to South Georgia] –from Frank Worsley’s account ‘Endurance’— “On the thirteenth day we were getting nearer to our destination. If we made the tragic mistake of passing it we could never retrace our way on account o the winds and currents, it therefore became essential that I … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 6. 1916: “. . . . it was the best that I could do.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, aboard the ‘James Caird’ along on the way to South Georgia

–from Frank Worsley’s account ‘Endurance’— “The oars lashed outside on the decking were catching the spray and holding up masses of ice. Shackleton decided that we should have to part with all but two; so the rest of them were thrown overboard, and a trying moment it was when they splashed into the sea, for … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, aboard the ‘James Caird’ along on the way to South Georgia

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 6, 1916: “We bailed with the energy of men fighting for life. . . . “

–from Ernest Shackleton’s account “South”— On the tenth night Worsley could not straighten his body after his spell at the tiller. He was thoroughly cramped, and we had to drag him beneath the decking and massage him before he could unbend himself and get into a sleeping-bag. A hard north-westerly gale came up on the … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 6, 1916: “We bailed with the energy of men fighting for life. . . . “

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 1, 1916: “Life was not so bad after all.”

–from Ernest Shackleton’s account “South”— “. . . .we were cheered by a change for the better in the weather. The wind dropped, the snow-squalls became less frequent, and the sea moderated. . . .The sun came out bright and clear, and Worsley got a snap for longitude.. . . . Porpoises came blowing round … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 1, 1916: “Life was not so bad after all.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 28-29, 1916: “A thousand times it appeared as though the ‘James Caird’ must be engulfed. . . .”

–from Ernest Shackleton’s account “South”— “A severe south-westerly gale on the fourth day out forced us to heave to. I would have liked to have run before the wind, but the sea was very high and the ‘James Caird’ was in danger of broaching to and swamping. The delay was vexatious, since up to that … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 28-29, 1916: “A thousand times it appeared as though the ‘James Caird’ must be engulfed. . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 28, 1916: “By the second night we had set watches. . . .”

–from Frank Worsley’s account ‘Endurance’— [aboard the ‘James Caird’ on the fourth day since leaving Elephant Island] “By the second night we had set watches, Shackleton taking one, and I taking the other. . . .The divided watches gave us three men each, all three taking turns at steering. As the journey progressed, our ideas … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 28, 1916: “By the second night we had set watches. . . .”