Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, October 19, 1915: “. . . impossible to get under way. . .”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail”— October 19th, Tuesday. Up at 5.30. Had a bad night, shivering. Temp. during night, -26. Under way at 8. Light strenuous for the eyes. Passed over the last crevasse [i.e. southbound clear of the crevassed area east of White Island] 10.30. There were over 80 of them … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, October 19, 1915: “. . . impossible to get under way. . .”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, October 1, 1915: “. . . Up with the dawn of day. . .”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail”– “October 1st, Friday. Up with the dawn of day, with every hope, trusting we move off in excellent time. Turned out 6.30. The weather conditions are very thick to the south, with every indication of a blizzard. Breakfast: the party consisting of Capt. Mackintosh, Spencer-Smith, Hayward, Jack, … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, October 1, 1915: “. . . Up with the dawn of day. . .”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, September 1915: Plans for laying the depots

–from Shackleton’s account “South”– “The scheme adopted by Mackintosh, after discussion with the members of his party, was that nine men, divided into three parties of three each, should undertake the sledging. One man would be left at Cape Evans to continue the meteorological observations during the summer. The motor-tractor, which had been left at … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, September 1915: Plans for laying the depots

March 4, 1914: Shackleton at the Royal Geograhical Society

Shackleton was invited to address a committee of the Royal Geographical Society on March 4th, 1914. In response to a question about possible accidents along the TransAntarctic trail, he replied: “If a man broke his leg, or anything like that, and I was on the outward track, I would turn for that man and go … More March 4, 1914: Shackleton at the Royal Geograhical Society

January 20-22, 1912: Mawson struggles homeward

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “January 20 was a wretched overcast day and not improved by considerable wind and light drift. In desperation a start was made at 2 p.m. and, though nothing was visible beyond a few yards distant, I kept a steady course uphill and, assisted by the wind, … More January 20-22, 1912: Mawson struggles homeward

January 17, 1912: Mawson’s will to survive

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”— [Mawson had fallen into a crevasse, with no hope whatever of rescue] “From those flights of mind I came back to earth, and remembering how Providence had miraculously brought me so far, felt that nothing was impossible and determined to act up to [poet Robert] Service’s … More January 17, 1912: Mawson’s will to survive

January 17, 1912: Mawson alone, in the blue depths of the crevasse. . . .

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”— “January 17 was another day of overcast sky and steady falling snow. Everything from below one’s feet to the sky above was one uniform ghostly glare. . . . “I was hauling the sledge through deep snow up a fairly steep slope when my feet broke … More January 17, 1912: Mawson alone, in the blue depths of the crevasse. . . .