Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition. September 1, 1915: “The ice did not trouble us again seriously. . . .”

–from Shackleton’s account “South”– “The ice did not trouble us again seriously until the end of September, though during the whole month the floes were seldom entirely without movement. The roar of pressure would come to us across the otherwise silent ice-fields, and bring with it a threat and a warning. Watching from the crow’s-nest, … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition. September 1, 1915: “The ice did not trouble us again seriously. . . .”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 1915: “A pipe makes all the world akin.”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail”– “Many discussions have taken place re the sledging season. I have come to one conclusion, there can be no feasible solution until the Bluff Depot is laid. At least 3,000 pounds weight of stores must be sledged there before a definite plan can be arranged. We will … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 1915: “A pipe makes all the world akin.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 1915: “We are living the primitive life.. . .”

[Through a set of unavoidable circumstances, the Ross Sea Party had been divided into three separate parties, none of which had communication with either of the two others. The ship Aurora had been carried away into the Ross Sea, her fate unknown to those thus stranded ashore. The men remaining at Cape Evans—R. W. Richards, … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 1915: “We are living the primitive life.. . .”

3/26/24 Book Review: Meredith Hooper’s “The Longest Winter–Scott’s Other Heroes”

This website was never intended for words other than those quoted from the members of the Antarctic exploring parties who risked their lives in the name of science and discovery. However, there is one book so compelling in its subject matter, so detailed and literate in its delivery, that it deserves a mention here, and … More 3/26/24 Book Review: Meredith Hooper’s “The Longest Winter–Scott’s Other Heroes”

Winter 1913: Marking time at Cape Denison

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “Many have asked the question, ‘What did you do to fill in the time during the second year?’ “The duties of cook and night-watchman came to each man once every week, and meteorological and magnetic observations went on daily. Then were able to devote a good … More Winter 1913: Marking time at Cape Denison

August 4, 1913: “The Hut was almost completely buried. . .”

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “July concluded its stormy career with the astonishing wind-average of 63.6 miles an hour. We were all relieved to see Friday, August 1, appear on the modest calendar, which was the particular pleasure of each night-watchman to change. “After an immense deluge of snow on August … More August 4, 1913: “The Hut was almost completely buried. . .”

July 26, 1913: A hurricane on a clear day at Commonwealth Bay

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “From July 26 onwards the sky was cloudless for a week, and each day the northern sun would rise a fraction of a degree higher. The wind was very constant and of high velocity. “It was a grand sight to witness the sea in a hurricane … More July 26, 1913: A hurricane on a clear day at Commonwealth Bay

July 1913: Adelie Land’s greatest blows

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “Almost a fortnight now elapsed, during which the weather was “impossible.” In fact, the wind was frightful throughout the whole month of July, surpassing all its previous records and wearing out our much-tried patience. All that one could do was to work on and try grimly … More July 1913: Adelie Land’s greatest blows