Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, July 24, 1916: I never thought I should ever have to pray in earnest for ‘our daily bread.’ ”

—from the diary of Thomas Orde Lees— “24 July. Last night we got a splendid batch of 27 penguins, but as both bays are chock-a-block with ice, none can come up today. The Almighty has provided for us beyond our deserts. “I never thought I should ever have to pray in earnest for ‘our daily … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, July 24, 1916: I never thought I should ever have to pray in earnest for ‘our daily bread.’ ”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July, 1916: “. . . . a better pal amidst toil and trouble never existed.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— “All was going well until one day Richy [R. W. Richards] collapsed. He threw up his arms, gave a cry, and fell down in a faint. Cope was soon to his aid; the long journey had strained his heart. No words could express … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July, 1916: “. . . . a better pal amidst toil and trouble never existed.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “The hut on our first entering, although black and grimy, was like a palace to us.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— “Our first thoughts after the sad news were for the dogs; if they were not secured there would be some severe fighting. After which, we entered the Hut. It is 289 days since we left, and much snow has fallen on the Antarctic … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “The hut on our first entering, although black and grimy, was like a palace to us.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “Once more the Great White South has taken its toll.”

–from the diary of Ernest Joyce, published as “The South Polar Trail”— [The men marooned at the Discovery Hut since their return from the Barrier have determined to make their way over the sea ice to return to the hut at Cape Evans] “July 15th. This turned out a beautiful calm day with full moon, … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, July 15, 1916: “Once more the Great White South has taken its toll.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, July 23, 1916: “That night we lay off the ice in a gale, hove to . . .”

–from Shackleton’s account “South”— “That night we lay off the ice in a gale, hove to [about 108 miles offshore from Elephant Island] , and morning found the schooner [Emma] iced up. The ropes, cased in frozen spray, were as thick as a man’s arm, and if the wind had increased much we would have … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, July 23, 1916: “That night we lay off the ice in a gale, hove to . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, July 23, 1916: “. . . .unaware that you were standing on a foot-deep layer of penguin meat.”

—from the diary of Thomas Orde Lees— “22 July—The westerly blizzard shrieked all night but eased up at noon. East Bay is clear of ice and three penguins took advantage of it to come up. We took advantage of them to replenish our larder. If you stepped into our larder you would see nothing; you … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, July 23, 1916: “. . . .unaware that you were standing on a foot-deep layer of penguin meat.”

Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 23, 1916: ““I thank God that we have been spared through this fearful nightmare.”

–from the log kept by Captain Stenhouse— “July 23.—“Caught glimpse of Coulman Island through haze. . . . eighty miles off Coulman Island. Pressure continued intermittently throughout the day and night, with occasional very heavy squeezes to the ship which made timbers crack and groan. The ship’s stern is now in a more or less … More Shackleton’s “Aurora” adrift in the Ross Sea, July 23, 1916: ““I thank God that we have been spared through this fearful nightmare.”