Now in Print: “When Your Life Depends on It” co-authored by David Hirzel and Brad Borkan

Terra Nova Press is pleased to announce the publication of our latest book When Your Life Depends on It: Extreme Decision-Making Lessons from the Antarctic. Co-written by Brad Borkan (London), this book uses epic true stories from the “heroic age” of Antarctic exploration to place the reader in those life and death situations and asks … More Now in Print: “When Your Life Depends on It” co-authored by David Hirzel and Brad Borkan

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 27, 1915: Tom Crean’s dogs

–from Ernest Shackleton’s account “South”– “Crean had started to take the pups out for runs, and it was very amusing to see them with their rolling canter just managing to keep abreast by the sledge and occasionally cocking an eye with an appealing look in the hope of being taken along for a ride. As … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, May 27, 1915: Tom Crean’s dogs

March 25, 1913: Amundsen lectures in San Francisco

–from the San Francisco Chronicle, March 25 1913— “Captain Roald Amundsen, discoverer of the South Pole, held a large audience intensely intereste at Scottish Rite Hall last evening with his lecture on the experiences of the hardy band of Norwegian explorers, which successfully negotiated the formidable Ross barrier and planted the flag of their country … More March 25, 1913: Amundsen lectures in San Francisco

February 11, 1913: “But my husband is a good sport . . . (Kathleen Scott)

–from a news article in the San Francisco Chronicle February 11, 1913– “Mrs. Robert F. Scott left San Francisco last Wednesday on the Australian line steamer Anorangi, sanguine in the hope that she would greet her husband within two months at some New Zealand port. When seen here Mrs. Scott said she was sorry for … More February 11, 1913: “But my husband is a good sport . . . (Kathleen Scott)

January 29, 1913: Mawson’s good luck and near miss

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “. . . . there now remained only about twenty small chips of cooked dog meat and a few ounces of chocolate which I had kept carefully guarded for emergencies.  However, the wind and drift got up in the night and the start next morning was … More January 29, 1913: Mawson’s good luck and near miss

March 7, 1912: Amundsen and the Fram return to civilization

–from Amundsen’s account, “To the South Pole”- “Meanwhile we were nearing a pilot station, and a bustling little motor launch swung alongside.  ‘Want a pilot, captain?’  On positively started at the sound of the first new human voice.  communication with the outer world was again established.  The pilot–a brisk, good-humored old man–looked about him in … More March 7, 1912: Amundsen and the Fram return to civilization

March 6, 1912: Gran’s high hopes for Scott’s polar party

–from Tryggve Gran’s account, “The Norwegian with Scott”– “We exercised the mules after lunch, and then I made a trip with the dogs.  One dog was ill and breathed its last tonight; we dumped the corpse in the sea.  The poor thing died almost in my hands.  I was massaging its stomach when it gave … More March 6, 1912: Gran’s high hopes for Scott’s polar party

February 9-10, 1912: The Fram heads north, out of the frigid zone

–from Amundsen’s account “To the South Pole”– “Two days of fresh south-east wind took us comparatively quickly past the Balleny Islands, and on February 9 we could congratulate ourselves on being well out of the south frigid zone.  It was with joy that we had crossed the Antarctic Circle over a year ago, going south; … More February 9-10, 1912: The Fram heads north, out of the frigid zone

January 25, 1912: Amundsen reaches home base–Framheim

–from his account, “To the South Pole”– “The journey from 80 S. to Framheim has been so often described that there is nothing new to say about it.  On January 25, at 4 a.m., we reached our good little house again, with two sledges and eleven dogs; men and animals all hale and hearty. “We … More January 25, 1912: Amundsen reaches home base–Framheim