Winter 1913: Marking time at Cape Denison

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “Many have asked the question, ‘What did you do to fill in the time during the second year?’ “The duties of cook and night-watchman came to each man once every week, and meteorological and magnetic observations went on daily. Then were able to devote a good … More Winter 1913: Marking time at Cape Denison

July 1913: Adelie Land’s greatest blows

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “Almost a fortnight now elapsed, during which the weather was “impossible.” In fact, the wind was frightful throughout the whole month of July, surpassing all its previous records and wearing out our much-tried patience. All that one could do was to work on and try grimly … More July 1913: Adelie Land’s greatest blows

July 1912: Overwintering at Cape Evans

–from Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s account “The Worst Journey in the World”– “We had lectures, but not as many as during the precious winter when they became rather excessive:  and we included outside subject.  We read in many a polar book of the depressions and trials of the long Polar night; but thanks to gramphones, pianolas, variety … More July 1912: Overwintering at Cape Evans

July 21, 1912: Wind and calm at Commonwealth Bay

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– There was much expected of july, but the wind soughed on and the temperature decreased.  Just to demonstrate its resource, the wind maintained ninety-seven miles per hour for six hour on July 19, while the puffanemometer indicated several “breaks” of one hundred fifty miles per hour. … More July 21, 1912: Wind and calm at Commonwealth Bay

July 1912: At Cape Evans “Blizzard followed Blizzard”

–from Cherry-Garrard’s account “The Worst Journey in the World”– “Blizzard followed blizzard, and at the beginning of July we had four days which were the thickest I have ever seen.  Generaly when you go out into a blizzard the drift is blown from your face and clothes, and though you cannot see your stretched-out hand, … More July 1912: At Cape Evans “Blizzard followed Blizzard”

June 1912: Night Watch at Commonwealth Bay

–from Douglas Mawson’t account, “The Home of the Blizzard”– “The whole world is asleep except the night-watchman, and he, having made the bread, washed a tubful of clothes, kept the fire going, observed and made notes on the aurora every fifteen minutes and the weather every half-hour, and, finally, having had a bath, indulges in … More June 1912: Night Watch at Commonwealth Bay