November 1913: A Calm Evening in Adelie Land

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “A calm evening in November! At ten o’clock a natural picture in shining colours is painted on the canvas of the sea and sky. The northern dome is a blush of rose deepening to a warm terra-cotta along the horizon, and the water reflects it upward … More November 1913: A Calm Evening in Adelie Land

January 29, 1913: Mawson’s good luck and near miss

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “. . . . there now remained only about twenty small chips of cooked dog meat and a few ounces of chocolate which I had kept carefully guarded for emergencies.  However, the wind and drift got up in the night and the start next morning was … More January 29, 1913: Mawson’s good luck and near miss

January 13, 1913: The “Aurora” returns to Cape Denison

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”— “The first ice was reached at 6 p.m. on January 10 in about latitude 64 degrees 30′ S. The pack-ice zone was traversed on the 11th and 12th, and at 2 a.m. on the 13th the anchor was dropped at Cape Denison. At that date there … More January 13, 1913: The “Aurora” returns to Cape Denison

Midwinter’s Day 1912: Mawson’s Hut at Commonwealth Bay

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “Midwinter’s Day!  For once, the weather rose to the occasion and calmed during the few hours of the twilight-day.  It was a jovial occasion, and we celebrated it with the uproarious delight of a community of young men unfettered by small conventions.  The sun was returning, … More Midwinter’s Day 1912: Mawson’s Hut at Commonwealth Bay

May 1912: Domestic Life at Commonwealth Bay

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “For downright, tantalyzing cheerfulness there was no one to equal the night-watchman.  While others strove to collect their befuddled senses [on being awakened in the morning], this individual prated of “wind eighty miles per hour with moderate drift” and “brilliant St. Elmo’s fire.”  He boasted of … More May 1912: Domestic Life at Commonwealth Bay

April 1912: Troglodytes at Cape Denison

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “At the inner extremity of the entrance tunnel, the roar of the tempest died away to a rumble, the trap-door opened and perhaps the strains of the gramophone would come in a kind of flippant defiance from the interior.  Passing through the vestibule and workshop one … More April 1912: Troglodytes at Cape Denison

Early April 1912: Life in Mawson’s hut at Cape Denison

–from Douglas Mawson’s  account “the Home of the Blizzard”– “Noise was a necessary evil, and it commenced at 7.30 a.m., with the subdued melodies of the grampophone, mingled with the stirring of the porridge-pot and the clang of plates deposited none too gently on the table.  At 7.50 a.m. came the stentorian:  ‘Rise and shine!’ … More Early April 1912: Life in Mawson’s hut at Cape Denison

April 6, 1912: Sea ice off Cape Denison in Adelie Land

–from Douglas Mawson’s account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “Whenever a temporary calm intervened, a skin of ice quickly appeared over the whole surface of the water.  In the early stages this formation consisted of loose, blade-like crystals, previously floating below the surface and rising by their own buoyancy.  At the surface, if undisturbed, they … More April 6, 1912: Sea ice off Cape Denison in Adelie Land

April 2, 1912: Cold inside Mawson’s hut at Commonwealth Bay

–from his account “The Home of the Blizzard”– “A temperature taken within the hut varied according to the relative position in reference to the walls and stove.  That shown by the thermometer attached to the standard barometer, which was suspended near the centre of the room, was taken as the “hut temperature.”  Near the floor … More April 2, 1912: Cold inside Mawson’s hut at Commonwealth Bay

Late March, 1912: At Cape Denison (Mawson’s base in Adelie Land) a new sport is invented

“Before the are of “hurricane-walking” was learnt, and in the primitive days of ice-nails and finnesko, progression in high winds degenerated into crawling on hands and knees.  Many of the more conservative persisted in this method, and, as a compensation, became the first exponents of “board-sliding.”   A small piece of board, a wide ice-flat, and … More Late March, 1912: At Cape Denison (Mawson’s base in Adelie Land) a new sport is invented