Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 1915: The Blubber Stove

–from R. W. Richards’ account– “Flames [from the burning blubber in the stove] would roar fiercely through the flue while melted blubber dribbled out and ran down the front of the range. At the same time black, oily smoke would permeate every nook and cranny in the hut. As the months passed everything became covered … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 1915: The Blubber Stove

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 2, 1915: “The hut to us seemed like a palace.”

–from Ernest Joyce’s diary— “June 2nd. Under way for Cape Evans [having departed from their exile at the Discovery hut], 13 ½ miles away. When we started the moon was shining brightly In an hour it was obscured. This was unfortunate. About eight miles from Hut Point is a Glacier Tongue, a huge formation about … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 2, 1915: “The hut to us seemed like a palace.”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 1915: “We are living the primitive life.. . .”

[Through a set of unavoidable circumstances, the Ross Sea Party had been divided into three separate parties, none of which had communication with either of the two others. The ship Aurora had been carried away into the Ross Sea, her fate unknown to those thus stranded ashore. The men remaining at Cape Evans—R. W. Richards, … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, June 1915: “We are living the primitive life.. . .”

Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, April 19, 1915: The ‘Aurora’ ties up off Cape Evans

–from R. W. Richards’ account “The Ross Sea Shore Party, 1914-1917”– [The ‘Aurora’ had been tied up off Cape Evans, with stout steel hawsers linking her to the shore, intending to winter-over there.] “In the meantime, fires were drawn on the ship and the boiler blown down. Some dismantling of the engines also took place … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, April 19, 1915: The ‘Aurora’ ties up off Cape Evans

January 18, 1913: “Terra Nova in sight! Hurrah! Hurrah!”

–from Tryggve Gran’s Antarctic diary published as The Norwegian with Scott— “8 January. Terra Nova in sight! Hurrah! Hurrah! Great jubilation! Hurrah! “(Evening) We are saved. It was a piece of luck, for we had this morning begun to prepare for another winter here [at Cape Evans]. Teddy Evans is on board. All’s well at … More January 18, 1913: “Terra Nova in sight! Hurrah! Hurrah!”

January 16, 1913: “. . .minor preparations for another year down here. . . “

–from Frank Debenham’s account “The Quiet Land— [at Cape Evans] “Brisk north wind today, and pack will be back again before long, I expect. Early this morning there was a very energetic cry of ‘Ship ahoy’ from Crean, but for the hundredth time the ship gradually turned into an iceberg. In fact the only certain … More January 16, 1913: “. . .minor preparations for another year down here. . . “

January 11, 1913: Cape Evans–Scott’s men still waiting for the ship

–from Frank Debenham’s diary published as “The Quiet Land”– “11.1.13″ Still no ship. There is plenty of time yet, of course, but most of us expected her [the Terra Nova on her anticpated return to take off the wintering party of Scott’s last expedition] before now. Some of the men have made up their minds … More January 11, 1913: Cape Evans–Scott’s men still waiting for the ship

January 2, 1913: Waiting for the Terra Nova at Cape Evans

–from Frank Debenham’s diary published in “The Quiet Land”– “2.1.12. Last volume of the diary now–expect I shall not get very far with it before there is no need to write more, as even now we are daily expecting the ship. All last month I was away up Erebus, and over at Cape Royds, getting … More January 2, 1913: Waiting for the Terra Nova at Cape Evans

December 31, 1912: New Year’s Eve at Cape Evans

–from Tryggve Gran’s diary published as “The Norwegian with Scott“– “31 December. The last day of this trange year has come. I hope 1913 will bring me some of the luck lacking in 1912. Tonight two years have passed since the polar land mass came into sight for the first time. It was just such … More December 31, 1912: New Year’s Eve at Cape Evans

December 28, 1912: Waiting for the ship at Cape Evans

–from Tryggve Gran’s diary published as “The Norwegian with Scott“– “The Terra Nova must have been underway a fortnight now [The ship had left Lyttleton, NZ on 14 December under the command of Commander E. R. G. R. Evans, fully recovered from scurvy and specially promoted for Antarctic service], and if she does not run … More December 28, 1912: Waiting for the ship at Cape Evans