Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, November 19, 1915: “If I were in civilization I would not venture two yards. . . .”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail”— “November 19th, Friday. Up 5.45. Clear. Under way as usual. Going not too good, sinking well in. At 10.30 came across another bergschrund, took photos of same. It is an extraordinary sight. Blue ice about 70 feet from the level of the barrier, crevassed with overhanging snow … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, November 19, 1915: “If I were in civilization I would not venture two yards. . . .”

March 25, 1913: Amundsen lectures in San Francisco

–from the San Francisco Chronicle, March 25 1913— “Captain Roald Amundsen, discoverer of the South Pole, held a large audience intensely intereste at Scottish Rite Hall last evening with his lecture on the experiences of the hardy band of Norwegian explorers, which successfully negotiated the formidable Ross barrier and planted the flag of their country … More March 25, 1913: Amundsen lectures in San Francisco

November 24, 1912: . . .a glut of foot-walloping today. . .

–from Apsley Cherry Garrard’s The Worst Journey in the World— “November 24.  Early morning.  A glut of foot-walloping in soft snow and breaking crusts.  We have done between 17 and 18 miles today.  We saw no crevasses, and have maked the course well, building up the cairns and leaving two flags–so the mule party should … More November 24, 1912: . . .a glut of foot-walloping today. . .

May 7, 1912: “A beautiful calm day for a change. . . .”

–from Frank Debenham’s account “The Quiet Land”– “7.5.12  A beautiful calm day for a change.  At noon today there was a glorious sunrise–or sunset.  Which does one say when the sun never appears?  The low stratus clouds to the north were a deep crimson against the dead white of the surface of the Barne Glacier … More May 7, 1912: “A beautiful calm day for a change. . . .”

April 28, 1912 continued: “As to what may have happened. . . .”

–from Frank Debenham’s diary published as “The Quiet Land”– “As to what may have happened.  Atch [Dr. Atkinson] and Charles [Wright] who both know the Beardmore, think the whole party has gone down a crevasse.  I, with less knowledge, but the delay down to bad health, in fact to the dreaded scurvy which showed in … More April 28, 1912 continued: “As to what may have happened. . . .”

March 29, 1912: For Scott’s polar party on their return journey, the end is at hand

Thursday, March 29.  “–Since the 21st we have had a continuous gale from W.S.W and S.W.  We had fuel to make two cups of tea apiece and bare food for two days on the 20th.  Every day we have been ready to start for our depot 11 miles away, but outside the door of the … More March 29, 1912: For Scott’s polar party on their return journey, the end is at hand

March 19, 1912: Scott–“We have two days’ food but barely a day’s fuel.”

“Monday, March 19.  Lunch.  We camped with difficulty last night, and were dreadfully cold till after our supper of cold pemmican and biscuit and half a pannikin of cocoa cooked over the spirit.  Then, contrary to expectation, we got warm and all slept well.  To-day we started in the usual dragging manner.  Sledge dreadully heavy.  … More March 19, 1912: Scott–“We have two days’ food but barely a day’s fuel.”

March 16 or 17, 1912: Titus Oates–“I may be some time. . . .”

–from Robert F. Scott’s sledging diary– “Friday, March 16 or Saturday 17.–Lost track of dates, but think the last correct.  Tragedy all along the line.  At lunch, the day before yesterday, poor Titus Oates said he couldn’t go on; he proposed that we should leave him in the sleeping-bag.  That we could not do, and … More March 16 or 17, 1912: Titus Oates–“I may be some time. . . .”

March 7, 1912: Scott’s party on the Barrier–a slow, inevitable decline

–From Scott’s diary– “Wednesday, March 7–A little worse I fear.  One of Oates feet very bad this morning.  He is wonderfully brave.   We still talk of what we will do together at home. “We only made 6-1/2 miles yesterday (R. 49)  This morning in 4-1/2 hours we did just over 4 miles.  We are 16 … More March 7, 1912: Scott’s party on the Barrier–a slow, inevitable decline