Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, October 26-27, 1915: “So ended our first depot laying journey.”

–from Ernest Joyce’s account “The South Polar Trail”— “October 26th, Tuesday. Up 5.30. Slept the sleep of the just. Temp. -26. Under way as usual. Sighted our Corner Camp (10 miles south of Safety Camp) 10.25, reaching same 12.25. Lunch. Here we had left a large quantity of stores on the way out. Now we … More Shackleton’s Ross Sea Party, October 26-27, 1915: “So ended our first depot laying journey.”

November 4, 1913: Ponting’s Motion Pictures of Scott

–from the San Francisco Chronicle, November 4, 1913– “There is a splendid series of motion pictures on exhibition this week at the Savoy Theater, pictures all of which were taken by Herbert Ponting who was the official artist of Captain Scott’s Expedition to the South Pole. Some of the pictures are truly remarkable for their … More November 4, 1913: Ponting’s Motion Pictures of Scott

November 12, 1912: A burial on the Barrier

–from Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s account The Worst Journey in the World— “Nearly midday.  11-12 miles south of One Ton.  . . .Then Atkinson read the lesson from the Burial Service from Corinthians.  Perhaps it has never been read in a more magnificent cathedral and under more impressive circumstances–for it is a grave which kings must envy.  … More November 12, 1912: A burial on the Barrier

November 12, 1912: “We have found them. . . .it is too bad for words.”

–from Apsley Cherry-Garrard’s account The Worst Journey in the World — “November 12.  Near midday.  11-12 miles south of One Ton.  We have found them–to say it has been a ghastly day cannot express it–it is too bad for words.  The tent was there, about half-a-mile to the west of our course, and close to … More November 12, 1912: “We have found them. . . .it is too bad for words.”

April 28, 1912 continued: “As to what may have happened. . . .”

–from Frank Debenham’s diary published as “The Quiet Land”– “As to what may have happened.  Atch [Dr. Atkinson] and Charles [Wright] who both know the Beardmore, think the whole party has gone down a crevasse.  I, with less knowledge, but the delay down to bad health, in fact to the dreaded scurvy which showed in … More April 28, 1912 continued: “As to what may have happened. . . .”

April 28, 1912: From Cape Evans, “The facts appear to be these. . . .”

–from Frank Debenham’s diary, published as “The quiet Land”– “On the 26th they [Atkinson’s party to relieve Campbell’s northern party] got back to Hut Pt as reported by signal (blue lights) but we don’t know whether Campbell’s party are wit them or not. “No other signals have come and hope has gradually died.  I can’t … More April 28, 1912: From Cape Evans, “The facts appear to be these. . . .”

March 29, 1912: For Scott’s polar party on their return journey, the end is at hand

Thursday, March 29.  “–Since the 21st we have had a continuous gale from W.S.W and S.W.  We had fuel to make two cups of tea apiece and bare food for two days on the 20th.  Every day we have been ready to start for our depot 11 miles away, but outside the door of the … More March 29, 1912: For Scott’s polar party on their return journey, the end is at hand

March 22-23, 1912: Scott’s party stopped by a blizzard 11 miles short of One Ton Depot

–from Scott’s diary– Wednesday, March 21.  “–Got within 11 miles of [One Ton] depot Monday night; had to lay up all yesterday in severe blizzard.  Today forlorn hope, Wilson and Bowers going to depot for fuel. Thursday, March 22 and 23,  “–Blizzard bad as ever–Wilson and Bowers unable to start–tomorrow last chance–no fuel and only … More March 22-23, 1912: Scott’s party stopped by a blizzard 11 miles short of One Ton Depot

March 19, 1912: Scott–“We have two days’ food but barely a day’s fuel.”

“Monday, March 19.  Lunch.  We camped with difficulty last night, and were dreadfully cold till after our supper of cold pemmican and biscuit and half a pannikin of cocoa cooked over the spirit.  Then, contrary to expectation, we got warm and all slept well.  To-day we started in the usual dragging manner.  Sledge dreadully heavy.  … More March 19, 1912: Scott–“We have two days’ food but barely a day’s fuel.”

March 16 or 17, 1912: Titus Oates–“I may be some time. . . .”

–from Robert F. Scott’s sledging diary– “Friday, March 16 or Saturday 17.–Lost track of dates, but think the last correct.  Tragedy all along the line.  At lunch, the day before yesterday, poor Titus Oates said he couldn’t go on; he proposed that we should leave him in the sleeping-bag.  That we could not do, and … More March 16 or 17, 1912: Titus Oates–“I may be some time. . . .”