Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, June 23, 1916: The day after Midwinter’s Day at Cape Wild, Elephant Island

—from the diary of Thomas Orde Lees— “23 June. Midwinter’s Day is a thing of the past and once more we have been hungry again. What then do we have to look forward to now? Our rescue, whenever that may be; but almost as cheering, the certainty of the sun’s return, and therefore increasingly lengthening … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, June 23, 1916: The day after Midwinter’s Day at Cape Wild, Elephant Island

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 17, 1916: “Then came a hard pull for life, hugging the land and making less than a foot at a time.”

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “Great was our joy to hear that Wild had found a decent camping place about 6 miles to the W—apparently the only possible place they saw. . . . “All hands were called to lash up and stow about 5.0 a.m. on Monday 17th. The three boats were … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 17, 1916: “Then came a hard pull for life, hugging the land and making less than a foot at a time.”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 9, 1916: “At 1 pm came the order to launch the boats. . . .”

–from the diary of Thomas Orde Lees— “9 April. Less swell but any amount of open water all around us. Sir Ernest spent much of the time in cogitation and finally determined to make a start in the boats. We packed up all we could carry. The floe split again during the morning and there … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 9, 1916: “At 1 pm came the order to launch the boats. . . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 8, 1916: “. . . Clarence Is. is much clearer today. . .”

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “8 April. . 62º 6’ S., 53º 49’ W. Since yesterday WSW winds have prevailed: the position is disappointing as the current seems to be carrying us rapidly eastwards [that is, away for Elephant and Clarence Islands, the only likely landfalls]. “In spite of that Clarence Is. is … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 8, 1916: “. . . Clarence Is. is much clearer today. . .”

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 1, 1916: Fresh fish

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 1, 1916: Fresh fish –from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “Yesterday we had some fresh fish for lunch, the pick of about 60 undigested fish found in the stomach of the Sea Leopard shot on Thursday—white sweet flesh and very agreeable.” Thomas Orde Lees adds some piquant details: “No April … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 1, 1916: Fresh fish

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 31, 1916: “The ‘Stancomb Wills’ had been launched for us. . .“

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “30 March. A bad latitude shows us to be 63º 6’5’ S; due of course to all these northerly wet winds. Now the wind is S and the temperature much lower. Things are stiff and frozen and very uncomfortable. “70 Adelies were got this morning; but we were … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 31, 1916: “The ‘Stancomb Wills’ had been launched for us. . .“

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 30, 1916: “The two remaining dog teams were shot this afternoon.“

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “The most anxious day we have had since the ship was crushed. Shorly after 5.0 am a crack opened not more than 5 yds S of the galley: before the half hour the Boss had called everyone to stand by. Some of the meat was on the far … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 30, 1916: “The two remaining dog teams were shot this afternoon.“

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 24, 1916: “W. Joinville Land very clearly seen this morning from 7.30 onwards.“

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “24 March. . 63º 13’5’ S., 53º 24’ W. Joinville Land very clearly seen this morning from 7.30 onwards. The highest summit, which we call Mt. Percy has twin peaks; to the north of it are two conspicuous domes and then much farther N another small rise. “It … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 24, 1916: “W. Joinville Land very clearly seen this morning from 7.30 onwards.“

Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 23, 1916: “At last we have really sighted the land. “

–from the diary of Sir James Wordie— “23 March. . 63º 15’5’ S., 53º 29’ W. At last we have really sighted the land. The honour belongs to the Boss, who sighted it in the west about 8.30 am. What we saw was a dark mass, very far off, whose surface one would describe as … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, March 23, 1916: “At last we have really sighted the land. “