December 28, 1911: First Supporting Party at Shambles Camp

–from Charles “Silas” Wright’s diary– “Lunch at bottom glacier depot [Lower Glacier Depot after] eight miles.  Camp twelve and a quarter miles at pony murder [site, Shambles Camp] and sledges.  On the Barrier again. “Take on a 10 ft. instead of a 12 ft. sledge here.  Rock collected from foot of Mt. Hope.  Came down … More December 28, 1911: First Supporting Party at Shambles Camp

December 9, 1911: The end of Scott’s Blizzard Camp

From “South With Scott,” Lt. Edward ‘Teddy’ Evans’ account: “On December 9 the blizzard was really over; we completed the digging out of sledges and stores and wallowed sometimes thigh-deep whilst getting the ponies out of their snow-drifted shelters.  Then we faced probably the hardest physical test we had since the bailing out in the … More December 9, 1911: The end of Scott’s Blizzard Camp

December 6, 1911: Scott’s Blizzard Camp, Day Two

(from Scott’s diary) “Camp 30.  The tempest rages with unabated violence.  The temperature has gone to +33; everything in the tents is soaking.    People returning from the outside look exactly as though they have been in a heavy shower of rain.  They drip pools on the floor-cloth. (from Birdie Bowers’ diary account) “We try to … More December 6, 1911: Scott’s Blizzard Camp, Day Two

December 5 1911: Scott’s Blizzard Camp, Day One

“Tuesday, 5 December.  Camp 30.  Noon. “We awoke this morning to a raging howling blizzard. . . .After a minute or two in the open one is covered from head to foot.  The temperature is high, so that what falls or drives against one sticks.  The ponies–heads, tails, legs and all parts not protected by … More December 5 1911: Scott’s Blizzard Camp, Day One

December 1, 1911

On this date Scott’s party, their rate of travel determined by the speed of their horse transport, have been on the trail for one month.  At 81 degrees South latitude, they have come about 350 miles, less than half the distance from Cape Evans to the South Pole.  Having closed with the Trans-Antarctic Mountains, they are nearing … More December 1, 1911

November 28, 1911: “Chinaman died today. . .”

From Charles “Silas” Wright’s diary: “Head wind 25 m.p.h all day.  Surface as yesterday but patches of sastrugi fairly good.  Light very bad, at times could not see 4 in. [deep] footsteps under feet though paty three quarters of a mile away [was] visible. . . . “Chinaman [Wright’s pony] died tonight of senile decay … More November 28, 1911: “Chinaman died today. . .”

The first of the ponies to Go: Cherry-Garrard’s Account

–November 24, 1911– “All depended on the weather, and just now it was glorious, and the ponies were going steadily together.  Jehu, the crockiest of the crocks was led back along the track and shot on the evening of 24 November, having reached a point at least 15 miles beyond where Shackleton shot his first … More The first of the ponies to Go: Cherry-Garrard’s Account