Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 5, 1915: Slow drift north

–from Sir James Wordie’s diary– “5 April. After much waiting we got a position yesterday: 79º 9′ S., 37º 50′ W. The northerly course was somewhat disappointing, but not unexpected, looking to the series of nearly equal soundings. Yesterday’s soundings, eg was 250 fms. Today’s 245 and previously we had 264, 262, and 256; obviously … More Shackleton’s ‘Endurance’ Expedition, April 5, 1915: Slow drift north

December 1914: The Endurance stuck at South Georgia, waiting for an opening into “Weddell’s White Hell”

–from Frank Hurley’s account “Shackleton’s Argonauts”— “Information gathered at South Georgia from whaling captains corroborated the records of the few expeditions that had visited the region of our forthcoming activities—the Weddell Sea—and indicated that its waters were so congested with ice as to be almost unnavigable. They averred that we had only a fifty-fifty chance … More December 1914: The Endurance stuck at South Georgia, waiting for an opening into “Weddell’s White Hell”

November 26, 1912: “. . .our ice drift had come to an end.”

–from Wilhelm Filchner’s account To the Sixth Continent— “From this date onwards [November 22] our drift was again in a south-southeasterly direction.  On the 23rd a crack appeared in the young ice in the channel we had blasted, running southwest.  The crack ran through the young ice of the lead east of the ship until … More November 26, 1912: “. . .our ice drift had come to an end.”

November 16, 1912: The Deutschland makes ready for the open sea

–from Wilhelm Filchner’s account To the Sixth Continent— [Filchner’s ship Deutschland had been beset in the Weddell Sea since March 6, 1912] “On 14 November Bjorvik drew my attention to the need to move the ship forcibly out of the floe an idea which I had been contemplating and discussing for some time. “15-26 November … More November 16, 1912: The Deutschland makes ready for the open sea

Late April 1912: Filchner’s observations on the Weddell Sea side of the continent

–from Wilhelm Filchner’s article “The German Antarctic Expedition” in the Bulletin of the American Geographical Society Vol 45, No. 6, 1913– “There was only meatre occurrence of aurorae australes.  We observed a few of them but they were weak, generaly a pale, flat arc over the southern horizon from which the rays shot out.  Only … More Late April 1912: Filchner’s observations on the Weddell Sea side of the continent

April 17, 1912: Filchner’s expedition settles in for the winter

–from Wilhelm Filchner’s article “The German Antarctic Expedition” in the Bulletin of the American Geographical Society Vol 45, No. 6, 1913– “By April 17 we were held fast in the midst of old floes in 72.24 S. and 40.12 W.  We had resigned ourselves to drifting, a condition we had tried to avoid, and we … More April 17, 1912: Filchner’s expedition settles in for the winter

March 2-7, 1912: Filchner driven away from land, away from Vahsel Bay

–from an abbreviated report by Wilhelm Filchner, on the results of his Antarctic expedition– “By March 2, however, Captain Vahsel considered the position of the ship dangerous and he favored taking her as soon as possible to the open sea.  Director Filchner finally decided to return north to winter in South Georgia and attempt another … More March 2-7, 1912: Filchner driven away from land, away from Vahsel Bay

February 18, 1912: Filchner’s landing place drifts out to sea

[The landing on the flat surface of an apparently stable iceberg had begun on February 8.] –from an abbreviated report by Wilhelm Filchner, on the results of his Antarctic expedition– “The work was delayed, however, by repeated storms; and on Feb. 18 the iceberg broke loose and began to drift.  The task of saving the … More February 18, 1912: Filchner’s landing place drifts out to sea